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Belize, North America and Caribbean

Malaria Risk Travel Information

What is the risk of malaria in Belize?

Malaria risk is low throughout the year in some areas of Stann Creek. Risk is negligible elsewhere.

Antimalarials are advised in Belize if you are visiting the risk areas. Please remember to also follow the bite avoidance measures below in all areas.

Please check HERE to see a malaria map of Belize on fitfortravel (a NHS website).

 

What Malaria prophylaxis do I need to prevent malaria in Belize?

You do not need a prescription to buy malaria medicine for Belize

You can order the suitable malaria medicine for these areas by clicking on the following links.

Avloclor Tablets (Chloroquine) Prefered antimalarial

Pauldrine tablets (Proguinal) only if Chloroquine not tolorated

We only dispense genuine UK licensed medicines.


So what else can I do to prevent malaria?

All travellers should however follow the bite avoidance measures below:

  • Use mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin or Deltamethrin. These insecticides kill mosquitoes instantly by acting on their central nervous system. During daytime, tie the net in a knot and leave it hanging from the ceiling. At bedtime untie the net and check carefully for hidden mosquitoes or any tears. Holes or tears must be mended with adhesive tape or thread. Tuck the edge of the net under the mattress and make sure there are no openings.
  • Apply insect repellent to all exposed areas of skin, avoiding eyes and mouth. Also apply to clothing, reapplying frequently in accordance with the manufacturers directions. We advise the use of N, N-diethylmetatoluamide (or DEET to you and me) containing products. DEET has been widely used for over 50 years and has quite clearly been shown to be one of the most effective repellent products. The use of 50% DEET products is usually sufficient in normal conditions. Our range of insect and mosquito repellent products can be found here.
  • From sunset onwards here are a few free and easy tips to reduce the chance of getting bitten. Wear long-sleeved shirts and long trousers, obvious, we know, but this will at least reduce skin available to be bitten. Wear Light colours as these attract mosquitoes less than dark clothing. Remember that aftershave and perfumes will tend to attract mosquitoes, so going without could help reduce the risk of being bitten.

Chikungunya virus infection in Caribbean islands and the Americas

This is a virus passed on by being bitten by infected mosquitos. The incubation period is typically 3–7 days and symptoms include acute onset of fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, conjunctivitis, nausea/vomiting, or rash. The symptoms usually go within 10 days but in some may last months especially the elderly and people with underlying health issues such as high blood pressure and diabetes.


As this is a virus, there is no medication to prevent or treat the disease and anti-malarial tablets such as Chloroquine will not have an effect on it.

Bite avoidance measures should be taken and followed  firmly to reduce the likelihood of being bitten.

The affected mosquitoes tend to bite during the day so wear long sleeved clothing and trousers wherever possible and ensure that a strong insect repellent is used and reapplied regularly, especially after swimming.

You should also sleep under a mosquito net and if you are staying for a long time or are unsure of the hotel/hostel, it would be advisable to take a battery operated or plug in mosquito killer for your room to kill any lingering mosquitos.

What Vaccines do I need for Belize?

Below is a table designed to show you what vaccines are mandatory, recommended or ones to consider when visiting Belize:

Cholera Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Japanese Encephalitis Meningitis Rabies
  Rec       Con

 

Tetanus Tick Borne Encephalitis   Typhoid   Yellow Fever Vaccine
Rec     Con    

Man = Mandatory
Con = Consider
Rec = Recommended
Req = Required if visiting from area with risk of transmission

Other countries in North America and Caribbean »